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ISEH 2022 Junior Faculty Session Highlights

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 Junior PI Networking Event – Raging Bull, Edinburgh, Scotland (Friday Sept. 2, 20:00-23:00) The newly formed Junior PI committee is following on from its successful webinar series highlighting the “ Journey and Lessons Learned ” by hosting a dedicated Junior PI Networking Event at this year’s ISEH Annual Meeting to build a strong, supportive community of junior faculty worldwide Starting out as a new PI can be a daunting proposition with challenges including moving to an entirely new institute, reducing hands-on time in the laboratory, securing competitive grant funding and the need to recruit new staff and students. All whilst sustaining scientific productivity and maintaining a work/life balance. It pays to remember that science at its core is a ‘ human business ’, with building meaningful relationships, a sense of community and learning through shared experience all being essential to the progress of science.   Whilst the sharing of knowledge has been accelerated and democratized t

2022 Interview Spotlight Series: Part I

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This week on Simply Blood we are kicking off our 2022 Interview Spotlight Series. In Part I we are featuring the ISEH 2022 New Investigator’s Invitee: Christina Halsey, PhD. Here, Dr. Halsey answers questions about her scientific passions, career path, mentorship and more. Interested in hearing more about Dr. Halsey’s fascinating work?  Don’t miss her session at the ISEH 51st Annual Scientific Meeting this September ! Dr Christina Halsey Professor of Paediatric Haemato-Oncology Institute of Cancer Sciences, Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre University of Glasgow, UK Interviewed by Camille Malouf,  ISEH New Investigators Committee  & Alasdair Duguid, PhD Student in the labs of Christina Halsey and Katrin Ottersbach.

Coming Back to In-Person Hematology: ASH 2021, A Re-Cap

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With relaxing COVID-19 restrictions toward the end of 2021, the American Society of Hematology (ASH) made a decision to offer a hybrid online/in-person format for the first time in Atlanta, USA. With this decision, ASH 2021 became a reference point on how to organize a hybrid meeting, and how to bring the hematology community together by engaging attendees both in-person and remotely. ISEH members had the chance to attend the best experimental hematology sessions both online and in-person, a number of which focused on the biology of clonal hematopoiesis and new molecular mechanisms driving malignant transformation, and are highlighted below. We also interviewed our ISEH member Dr. Alba Rodriguez-Meira, who presented her work through one of the Plenary Sessions at ASH 2021. A Few Highlights from ASH21 Sessions Taking advantage of state-of-the-art whole-genome sequencing technologies, Dr. Emily Mitchell from the Campbell Lab (Sanger Institute, Cambridge; Abstract 598) detailed their gro

Announcing the Next Editor-in-Chief of Experimental Hematology: Toshio Suda

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The ISEH has appointed Toshio Suda, Professor at the Cancer Science Institute at the National University of Singapore and Director of the International Research Center for Medical Sciences Kumamoto University, as the next editor-in-chief of Experimental Hematology , the society journal. Professor Suda will succeed Connie Eaves, Professor at the University of British Columbia, CA, who has led the journal since 2017. “We are thrilled that Toshio will be the next Experimental Hematology Editor-in-Chief.” said ISEH president Andrew Elefanty. “He follows on from Connie’s tenure which has seen a steady rise in journal impact as the society and journal reputation grow. Toshio’s exemplary reputation in the field and extensive background in HSC biology and other editorial roles makes him an excellent choice for this position.” For nearly 50 years, Experimental Hematology has published landmark papers in the field and has stood as a society run journal for the benefit of its members. Its focus

ISEH 2022: Exploring Scotland

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Are you still planning your conference schedule for 2022? This is your reminder to pencil in the ISEH 51st Annual Scientific Meeting being held in Edinburgh, Scotland from 1-4 September, 2022. Apart from amazing science, education, and networking opportunities, Scotland is always worth a visit. Why not explore the many castles in various parts of Scotland, including Balmoral Castle in beautiful Deeside? Experience the Highlands by going up north to Aviemore, the outdoor central of Scotland, or to stunning Glencoe, the backdrop to many films. Apart from the many Scottish traditions such as Tartan, Haggis, and Bagpipes, there is obviously Scottish Whiskey to be appreciated with more distilleries scattered around Speyside than anywhere else in Scotland. Make use of Scotland’s excellent travel system by train (Scotrail), by bus (megabus or citylink), or rent a car if you fancy legally driving on the other side of the road (Note: in the UK drive on the left hand side!). Stirling Castle, St

Parenting in Academia III: Japan, Sweden, USA

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In the last two weeks, we gained a lot of advice and suggestions from parenting scientists from all around the world. Some of the proposed changes will need time to be implemented as well as financial support to cover, for example on-site childcare. However, some changes can be made more easily such as not scheduling official institute meetings after 5 pm. This week we will hear from Dr. Shannon McKinney-Freeman (St. Jude Children’s research Hospital, USA) and Dr. Kenichi Miharada (Kumamoto University, Japan). They share their experience on how to progress as a scientist, while also spending time with your family. They focus on the financial challenges and the availability of daycare. One major take-home message from our journey around the world is, that the country-specific circumstances for parental leave and child care/child support are very different. Let’s try to learn from each other and implement as many beneficial measures as possible at our institutes to make scientific career

Parenting in Academia II: Australia, Germany, UK

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This week we continue our journey around the world and aim to learn more about different cultures and how to reconciliate a scientific career with having a family. Dr. Marieke Essers (German Cancer Research Center, Germany) and Dr. Edwin Hawkins (The Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research, Australia) are interviewed in this week’s edition and share some of their personal experiences. They both stress that there is no “right” time to start a family. If this is something you really envision for your life, it is something you should do. Of course, there will be major challenges ahead. But other people have done this before and most of them are accessible and happy to share their experiences. A major struggle for parenting scientists is that short-term evaluations of their scientific career/achievements are commonplace, which can make for an unfair assessment if the applicant recently had a child resulting in reduced scientific output during that period. Dr. Edwin Hawkins stre