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Should Scientists Use Twitter? The Answer is YES!

James Till, one of the preeminent pioneers of the hematopoietic stem cell field, is a staunch proponent of open-access publishing and sharing of science via social media, especially Twitter. When we interviewed him for this article, he stated, “A scientist can join Twitter in
order to share information of common interest to others in the same field. Twitter is a useful source of information about recent contributions to the areas of Open Access and Regenerative Medicine.”

Twitter is the fastest and easiest platform to get news. As scientists, our time is always limited but we also have the need to stay updated on the literature, scientific events and even to give our personal opinion on scientific discoveries or legislation that affect science. Twitter is the perfect tool for this.

We use multiple social media platforms to spread the word about ISEH, including Twitter, which we use to follow our annual meeting and to highlight news and papers from our community, with a special focus to …
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Embracing Research Across the Pond

Moving and traveling is an integral part of being a scientist. Whenever you go abroad for a study or work, it means you have to adapt to a new place, language, and culture. While we all speak the language of science and blood research, fitting into a new country and finding your way around can be challenging and confusing. In this blog post, I wanted to reflect on my own experiences working on two sides of the Atlantic Ocean, and to share advice from my 3 colleagues from South Korea, Sweden, and Japan, on succeeding in different research cultures.

The reasons for traveling as a scientist are multiple, and time spent abroad can vary dramatically from a few days to many years. The majority of important conferences rotate their locations all over the world (I am looking forward to the ISEH meeting in LA this year!). Wanting to pursue a particular topic or learning a unique technique often means you have to travel to a new country or even a new continent. Moreover, in some parts of the wor…

With a Little Help From My Friends

Happy 2018! The start of a new year is a time for making resolutions, reflecting on the past and looking forward to new opportunities. We have written many blogs about work-life balance and succeeding in science, and a common theme in many of these blogs is that none of us do it alone. We need friends and family to keep us grounded. At home, our partnerships are vital for maintaining our sanity and supporting our family responsibilities. Collaborations at work often allow us to take our science into new realms and also share both the fun and the burden of getting a project done. Friends in science are also necessary for venting; they can relate to struggles with experiments, publishing, and funding, sometimes offering a helping hand or simply a sympathetic ear. 

The community of ISEH is overflowing with close friends and collaborators. It is an ever-growing group that has the close-knit, inclusive feeling of family. Some friendships were forged at the annual ISEH meeting, while others…

Making the Leap, Part 5: Let’s Make a Deal

Negotiating a startup package can be an intimidating venture. Few of us scientists are well trained in business negotiation or contract law. Beyond that, there’s a great deal regarding startup packages that will seem unfamiliar to individuals making the transition to an academic faculty position. However, there are a few key guideposts that can help prospective faculty members successfully navigate the process from getting a draft offer to sealing the deal in a way that maximizes opportunities for success. Below I’ll discuss some of my experiences, as well as those of colleagues who have also recently made the leap.

Negotiation 101: It’s not personal, it’s business. How you conduct yourself in a negotiation process is just as critical as the substance of the discussion itself. After my interview process, I received offers from three institutions. My negotiating partner at each institution was the head of the program, department or division offering the position. In other words: they we…

Why Join ISEH? New Investigators Share Their Thoughts

Following the International Society for Experimental Hematology (ISEH) Annual Conference in Frankfurt, some of you may be wondering what else you can get out of your ISEH membership. To give some ideas, we asked members of the ISEH New Investigator Committee (NIC) why they belong to ISEH.

Isabel Beerman (NIH, USA) added “One of the most valuable aspects of my ISEH membership is the access to the network of outstanding researchers. This is highlighted at the annual meeting. This intimate gathering promotes interactions with investigators at all career stages and allows for open discussions of developing research programs. In addition, interactions between members is fostered throughout the year by ISEH sponsored events on the website that highlight relevant publications and provide great educational opportunities from the introduction to hematology (Hematology 101) to learning about emerging technologies driving the field forward (New Investigator Committee Webinars).”

Nina Cabezas-Walls…

How to Make the Most Out of Your Lab’s Move

“The lab is moving!” I must confess, when I heard these words from my mentor about a year and a half ago, my heart dropped. Lab relocation experiences are some of the worst horror stories that you hear from fellow researchers: precious samples lost, mouse colonies never recovered, months spent re-establishing protocols. Moreover, it also meant I would have to leave San Francisco, a beautiful city that I loved to live in, and where I found many friends. Being a scientist often means not having much choice of geographic location of your work. The choice of a particular subject or even broad field usually requires a move to a new city, or even a new country. Moving with the lab means making this choice again – do I leave my project and all the progress behind, or do I accept the delay in my research and go ahead. Now, two months after our move to New York, I would like to reflect on my experiences and that of my fellow lab members on our cross-country relocation from the trainee perspect…

When people can…

As long as I can remember, there were people marching on the streets, either protesting or celebrating or even supporting the topic of the manifestation. It always fascinated me how powerful people can be, when they come together. In cases of manipulation of the public opinion this is of course not good. However, many times this can influence things in a positive way. Coming from a country like Greece, I have to admit that it was fairly frequent for me to see people getting together on the streets for a variety of reasons. Then, when I moved myself and my life to Boston, these events happened less frequently. I remember that I joined a protest in Boston once (although maybe this is not the right time to admit such a thing). It was about the Gulf war and people wanting their children to come back home. The subject of the protest was noble, however only a few people participated. Thus, it was to my great surprise and satisfaction when on April 22nd, 2017 the March for Science was organi…