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Showing posts from September, 2019

Communication is king: Lessons for success in science communication

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Learning to communicate
The foundation of science is deeply rooted in fact and skepticism. Throughout scientific training, a scientist must master the skill of critical thinking. Without a strong logic or rationale, it is difficult to interpret your own work or that of others. Implicit to the mastery of critical thinking is the ability to convey your argument and critique others.

Like all skills, practice makes perfect. When you are just starting out, it is sometimes difficult to clearly convey your point confidently. The first step in gaining self-confidence is talking with your mentor and lab mates. This group will be most familiar with your work and can offer a detailed perspective on the project. The casual discussions that naturally occur in the laboratory and among your scientific friends lay the foundation for effective communication. Moreover, new and interesting collaborations can arise out of these interactions. My most successful and most fun collaborative projects arose o…

2019-2020 ISEH Board of Directors

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Glimpses of the 2019 ISEH Annual Scientific Meeting

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The 48th Annual International Society for Experimental Hematology meeting took place on 22-25 August, 2019 in Brisbane, Australia. Thank you to all of the attendees who joined us this year and celebrated the field of Hematology through research, networking and socializing with your peers. We captured many moments of the Annual Meeting and we are very excited to share them with you.

Thank you to Jess Gottgens and all of our photographers for taking these photos. To view more pictures please view our Google Photos Album.
We hope to see you all in New York in 2020! 

Lab Spotlight: Lancrin Lab

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Each month, Simply Blood spotlights a lab focused on the research of basic hematology, immunology, stem cell research, cell and gene therapy, and other related aspects. Get to know these different labs around the world! This month, we are featuring the Lancrin Lab at EMBL Rome - Epigenetics and Neurobiology Unit.

1. How long have you had your lab?
I have started my lab about 8 years ago.

2. How many members make up your lab?  Students/postdocs?
I have seven lab members including one lab manager, one PhD student, two Master students and three research assistants.

3. What is the major research theme of your lab?
Our major research goal is to understand our hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are produced during embryonic development. This happens through a process called endothelial to hematopoietic transition (EHT) when HSCs emerge from endothelial cells, the building blocks of blood vessels. This moment is critical because this is when our pool of HSCs is established for the rest of our lif…